On the psychogeography of cities and the internet

 

Screen Shot 2017-04-22 at 1.54.33 PM

Img[1]: Maze screensaver from Microsoft ‘95

[1] Situationism and the Internet

The enduring legacy of the Situationist dérive for the 21st century may include its status as a method for breaking out of the psychic boundaries that delimit one’s daily life to an unchanging routine. In a reflection on the psychogeography of Tijuana, Aurelio Meza quotes Guy Debord’s observation via the text of Chombart de Lauwe that over the course of a year, a student’s daily movements throughout the city of Paris formed “a small triangle with no significant deviations, the three apexes of which are the School of Political Sciences, her residence and that of her piano teacher.” Debord had expressed “outrage at the fact that anyone’s life can be so pathetically limited,” so he proposed the dérive—“a technique of rapid passage through varied ambiences”—as a method for expanding one’s psychogeographical limits. Where capitalism and modernity had together conspired to make narrow psychic hallways out of a large metropolis, surrealism would break things open and make the city a world again.

“On the psychogeography of cities and the internet”

On Modularism / Science and Capitalism in Louis-Ferdinand de Céline’s “Death on the Installment Plan”

001.1—Twentieth Century Modularism

I have gotten about two thirds of the way through Louis-Ferdinand Céline’s Death on the Installment Plan, a novel I first became aware of via an oblique reference made in Beck’s 2006 song The Horrible Fanfare/Landslide/Exoskeleton. First published in 1952, and then translated into English by Ralph Manheim in 1966, Death on the Installment Plan follows the childhood and adolescence of Ferdinand, the son of an abusive antiques salesman in the filthy slums of Paris. Described in the book jacket as “creative confessions,” this novel uses ellipses to stitch together narrative and emotional fragments that often turn extremely lewd. The book is full of shit and vomit, written in such a manic and sometimes slapstick way that reminds me of the baroque sadisms of writers like William S. Burroughs or Thomas Pynchon.

“On Modularism / Science and Capitalism in Louis-Ferdinand de Céline’s “Death on the Installment Plan””

On Modularism / Science and Capitalism in Louis-Ferdinand de Céline’s “Death on the Installment Plan”

anatomy_no_background-e1460121232638-640x416

img[1], Diagram of OSCAR from The Modular Body (2016), an “online science fiction story” by Floris Kaayk 

001—The Modularism of Blogging

Blogging is characterized by MODULARITY. (It is the medium of modular modernity, or modularism.) Blogging takes individualized snapshots of life that can be linked to one another, reordered or otherwise reorganized, individually deleted or repeated (reblogged, annotated, etc.)… The blog is always-already a collage or a palimpsest, but what must be recognized at this juncture is that if the blog is a collage or a palimpsest then it is one that is spread out in a line, composed of many dots held together by a loose and entangling thread. “On Modularism / Science and Capitalism in Louis-Ferdinand de Céline’s “Death on the Installment Plan””